When It’s Time to Change, You’ve Got to Rearrange…

Is it Time for a Job Change?

Any Brady Bunch fans out there? Remember the episode where Peter’s voice changes, and the kids are involved in a singing performance?

They all realize Peter can’t hit the same notes anymore in the original song they chose, so they adapt, and end up singing a NEW song that fits the new needs of all the group

(Feel free to sing along here, voice cracking emphasis included!): “When it’s time to change, you’ve got to rearrange, who you are and what you wanna be . . . Sha na na na na na na na na! Sha na na na na!”

So many of my clients realize they are in a job that is not serving their current needs, desires, and intentions anymore.

They are in a job that either bores them at best or sucks the lifeblood out of them at worse. And like most people in those situations, they are afraid to make a change.

Are you one of those?

“Named must your fear be before banish it you can.” – Yoda

While I sure hope not, if the answer is yes, then congratulations! Just like Peter & the gang, realizing a change is needed (or imminent) is the first step to making one!

This article called Ten Signs of a Fear-Based Workplace may sound all too familiar to you.  Your workplace, in short, may be ‘toxic’. I never recommend anyone stay in a job like that if this is the case for you. Plan your exit strategy ASAP.

Sometime, though, it’s more a gray area. While there are some things we can do to influence towards a positive change in our jobs, through targeted action, and positive attitudes, other things remain outside of our control.

Determining which is your situation, and therefore whether your job is salvageable through things you can do to improve it, or maybe not, is up to you.

But I encourage you to at least consider which situation you are in, if indeed you are unhappy.

Is it you?  Or,  is it ‘them’, the company? Be honest here.

  • Can you makes new choices to make changes within the job/company, or even just within your own approach to your job?
  • Or, does the choice need to be ‘time for a bigger change’, meaning a new job?

Again, I do hope you are fulfilled in your current job! But if you are like many that are not, I want to remind you of your alternatives.

Bottom line:  no, you don’t have to just put up with working in these types of environments out of fear.

Pick your favorite fear:

  • “this economy is bad, it’s too risky” or
  • “that’s the way it is everywhere so why bother” or
  • “I haven’t updated my resume or done a job search in (## of – but lots of) years!”
  • “I have kids to feed, I have to stay ‘safe’.” … All may be true, even (at least to a degree.)

However – what is also true, is this:  there are always better options. Yes, there are.

“Discover vocation and creation, and joy will come like clairvoyance, where blindness was before.” – Rumi

But first you have to decide that you want a change, and then, that you really know there IS a better place, job, boss, company, whathaveyou out there. And you can find it.

Job change, like any major change, requires we both identify, then confront our fears. It also requires we then take concrete action in a new career direction. For some, taking action helps them overcome or at least embrace those fears. Some job seekers will need to emotionally grapple with their fears FIRST, get clear on their next job move, and THEN take concrete actions to make that reality.

That’s what I do here — I help you fine tune the tools you need (resume, interview skills, cover letters, LinkedIn profiles) to find a job that’s a piece of your life that fits in beautifully with how you want, desire and intend it both your work and your life to be. You spend 8+ hours a day at your job. You really should feel good about it, don’t you think?

Just because most everyone you know is in a similar, less than happy work situation, doesn’t mean you have to settle for less than what you want. Find, then sing, a NEW song.

Sha na na na na!

“Don’t be satisfied with stories, how things have gone with others. Unfold your own myth.” – Rumi